Game Shopping

17 Oct

I made a trip to Goodwill today.  It’s my favorite place to shop for games and game pieces.  I’m probably one of the few people who doesn’t care if  some games are missing  pieces.  I supplement a lot of the games I already own so more children can play at the same time or I can replace lost parts.   I found I can often find directions to a game on the internet, if they are missing.  Part of a game can also be a source of inspiration for another game.

 What’s interesting to see is how games have changed over the years.  A few  of my games started out wood and are now made of plastic.  The kids marvel that some of my games are over 20 years old and I still have the parts to play.  It makes for a good discussion of taking care of what you own and having respect for another person’s property.  

   Parents will often ask me what they can do at home to help their children who have language delays.  The main complaint is they get one word responses like  “fine” when they try to talk to them.  We are in the golden age of technology and communication but it doesn’t seem to be at a family level.  There seems to be less opportunities for family members to actual talk to one another.  The trick is to create an opportunity for communication other than just asking questions.  Provide opportunities to talk about  impersonal topics and the personal ones will come along also.    I think a family game night can go far in creating a language rich experience and communication opportunity.   It’s one thing that has fallen off the grid with technology taking its place.  Children enjoy the interaction and it isn’t just another homework assignment.

There are quite a few commercial games that lend to vocabulary development and creative thinking.   For older students working on word associations and more global thinking, I have found  Apples to Apples, In a Pickle, and Scattergories to be good.  For younger students games such as  Kerplunk,  Don’t Spill the Beans, and Hi Ho Cherry O Game review concepts such as least, most, and more.  There are some good ones that aren’t  published anymore but keep you eyes open for them at garage sales etc.  Often the games don’t even look like they have been used.

Concept Group 5

14 Oct

This week we decided to tackle “left” and “right”.  This is a very difficult concept for 5 year olds, so we usually have several activities that go over it in the course of the year.  We start the activity by having children raise their right hand and then their left.  Funny how watching the person across the table from you just doesn’t work.   We also talk about some other cues people use like they write with their right hand and your left hand makes a natural L with your thumb and pointer finger.   As an adult you have to refrain from saying “Your right!” when they lift their left, which just adds to the confusion.

This activity uses the game of  “Blockhead”.   It’s listed on the vocabulary page as “Stacking Blocks“.  It involves spinning a spinner which tells you which hand you can pick up a block and then place on top of a growing tower of blocks in the center of the table.  If the blocks fall they are placed back into the box. 

 There is a friendly competition between table groups to see who can build the tallest tower and use all their blocks.  A couple of tables had natural born leaders who talked to their peers on the best block placements.  Other table groups were not so fortunate and had difficulty keeping their hands from the tower or taking appropriate turns.  A good introduction to team work.  In any case it was a learning experience beyond the concept words.

Concept Group 4

6 Oct

We were fortunate to have an adult volunteer in both the PM and AM classes.  This brought the table groups to 6 children with one adult.  What a difference this makes.  I would like to make a cheer and thankyou for all those parent volunteers out there. 

 The math program was reviewing shapes and catergorization this week.  My “Sequence Vocabulary” activity happens to have shapes in it, so I decided that would be a good activity.  Again I had to add 6 more sets of cards to accomodate our class size.  This was a matter of printing train and shape  pictures, pasting them on poster board, and laminating.  

In this activity the cards are drawn from a pile in the center of the table one by one.  The students have a possibility of getting a shape card or one of four cars to make a train.  It allows for the discussion of first, last, ending, middle, and  beginning of the train.  There is also a same and different decision to be made because a student doesn’t keep a card he already has.  These and the shapes go into a discard pile.  The first student to get the four train cards is declared the winner and the game can be played again.  Six students to a table made the turn taking much easier and the game appeared to go well. We went through the stack 3 times in a 20 minute period of time.  I had them each build a train sequence, review the sequence vocabulary and then rubber band each set so it would be ready for the next class.    The volunteers seemed to catch on quickly.  It’s good to have activities that don’t need much explanation.

Tools of the Trade

30 Sep

          I find it interesting to see what tools speech therapist find to be most helpful or  essential for the job.  I’ve moved and changed jobs frequently while following a military spouse.  There are some items that I try to get fairly quickly when I start a new job.  I thought you might like to hear what I find most useful beyond the usual articulation decks of cards and therapy materials.  

    tally counter  I’ve found a tally counter very useful for students working on articulation in conversational speech.  With this counter I can include them in groups that may be focusing on language activities.  They get the task of counting the sound they are working on as they speak.  It has the benefit of slowing the fast speakers down and making them think before they talk.  The students find operating the tally very motivating. I take my own count and we compare the count.  If we are doing an activity that requires a turn, I will give them a quota such as 20 words with a specific sound before stopping.

 timer A timer is used in some of the word games such as password.  It is used to measure conversational speech for a speech sample.  Some of my objectives use 3 minutes of conversational speech as part of the measurement.   It can be used to break up how much time I spend with each child in a group.  I will work with one child in a group for 1 to 2 minutes while 2 others in the group monitor themselves with a game of “Monkeys”.  The task becomes how many monkeys can be linked in 2 minutes. I find I can focus on the one student and not get distracted by the other two debating if a monkey was actually dropped. It allows students of a group to do an activity as a motivator while you work with another student.  This is necessary sometimes when one child needs to work on something different from the other members of the group.

                      white board    A small hand held white board can be used for many purposes.  Several of these can allow everyone in a group to be active.  Students can work on comprehension questions or main idea.  I can read a short paragraph and ask a question and give multiple choice questions.   Students can respond by putting a. b. or c. for multiple choice answers or write short answers. They can display their answers and defend them with members of the group.  I find I get more responses per student and less distraction from students waiting for a turn.  The students find writing and erasing a white board motivating.  I don’t have to copy papers for them to fill out and it’s much more interactive.  I like to stay away from the paper pencil type activities because so many of my students have difficulties attending to such task.

             Objects from a junk box have been a cheap source for therapy activities. They  are used in a number of ways.  It started out as a bunch of items to elicit specific sounds.  Over the years it’s also become objects that children find interesting and are good for vocabulary development.  A thimble, sea shells, and an old compass are favorites.  I use the objects in the grab bag for descriptive language practice and articulation practice.  The objects can also be used in a game of “Secret Box” where an item is hidden and the students ask questions to determine the identity of the object.  I use a present box that has a removable cover.

             A sock bag is a handy item because it forces use of the tactile senses. It  can be made from an old pair of jeans with a little bit of sewing.  I cut a leg off of an old pair of jeans to a length of 20 inches or so.  I sew across the bottom of one end.  I gather the other end.  I take the top of a sweat sock and cut the top off so I have a 10 inch length or so. I want the cuff portion and not the heel and foot section.  I then sew the cuff to the top of the jean section.  It can now be used as a grab bag.  I put objects from the junk box in it to to elicit descriptive vocabulary.  

.              A buzzer or bell is a good tool for group game type activities such as “College Bowl”.  Older students are motivated when using this.   They enjoy the competition to answer quickly and it provides a TV Game show  type atmosphere. It’s important to monitor its use however because quick responses do not work in every child’s favor.  It is also a natural motivator because kids just love to ring bells.

 So those are my top choices.  Does anyone else have anything they just can’t do without?  Just hit the comment button and add to the discussion.

Concept Group 3

29 Sep

Today was lesson 3 of our Kindergarten Concept Groups.  The Kindergarten teacher requested an activity that reinforced the concepts long and short since these were part of her math lesson for this week.  We did the Question Chain Activity which is posted on the vocabulary page.  It turned out to be a good choice because the counselor was taken out for an emergency and the college student had to pinch hit.   That would’ve been a big problem with some of the other activities.   Fortunately it’s an easy activity to pick up on.  I find it amazing that some of the most simple props can be quite motivating.  The kindergarten students really enjoy putting the links together and get into the competition of having the longer chain.  We also pointed out the chains that were equal or the same amount.  For the final concept they  ‘separated” them.   That is a concept that is frequently missed when we do our first BOEHM testing in the Fall.