Descriptive Bingo and Barrier Game with Egg Shapes

12 Apr

This is a descriptive barrier and bingo game I made a few years ago. In February of 2013 to be eggs act. Sorry I couldn’t resist that. It was so long ago that quite a few of you probably haven’t seen or found that post. I thought it would be a good time to bring this activity back up for review for Spring and give you a free activity. I will put a sample download toward the bottom of the post that you can print and use.

This is one was one of my favorite activities because it covered so many goals in a mixed group. I used it with students from upper elementary all the way to high school. I found that my high school students sometimes needed a break from all that drill and pencil/pad pushing work. The vocabulary used is often found in math and science materials.


The cards can be used in a variety of ways to include bingo, matching games, go fish, following multiple directions, comparisons, and finding a mystery card that is described. You can use a pack of colored pencils and have students draw what another student describes. I sometimes used an app called Educreations which turns an iPad into a drawing surface.

The following vocabulary can be elicited: inside, parallel, diagonal, end, striped, spotted, across, center, corner, intersect, above, below, vertical, horizontal, half, between, left, right, perpendicular, heart, square, diamond, triangle, rectangle, and star.
The cards range from eliciting two step directions (make a green star in a red triangle) to more complex directions that require 5 or more steps. For example: (draw red lines that intersect to form right angles to each other in the center, draw a red triangle in the upper left corner, a yellow circle in the upper right corner, a green heart in the lower left corner and a blue star in the lower right corner).
They can also be use for articulation practice for multiple syllable words containing /l,r,s/ and blends. It provides opportunity for spontaneous speech during a structured activity.

This is a picture of one of the Bingo cards.

Click on the star below for a one page copy of cards you can print out. There is a full set of cards and bingo boards on my store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

Click for a direct link to Teachers Pay Teachers

More Tier II Vocabulary Task Cards

3 Jan

Happy New Year! I hope you get off to a good start for the rest of your school year in 2019. I’m starting out the year with new vocabulary task cards. These cards are similar to the ones I made a couple of years ago using 4th grade vocabulary lists. This time I used Tier II Vocabulary lists from the 5th and 6th grade levels. I used as many words as I could that made sense within the context of the paragraphs I wrote. If you make it to the bottom of this post there is a free trial set.

They can also be used with older students who need supplemental help with vocabulary development.  They do not have pictures that older students would find childish or refer to grade levels on the cards. There is a vocabulary list included for instructor reference.

Core State Standards put a strong emphasis on vocabulary words that occur frequently in academic text.  These are referred to as Tier II Vocabulary.  Students come across these words when reading Science, Social Studies and English text so not knowing them can make reading and understanding academic text difficult.

I am always trying to figure out how I can make the biggest impact on my students in the classroom and I think concentrating on vocabulary at the later elementary to middle school level can make a big difference with their comprehension. These cards use the words within short paragraphs so they address comprehension within text as well as giving context clues toward the word meanings.

I am going to give you a chance to try them out with a trial deck of 10 cards. If they work for you, you might want to consider buying the full set on Teachers-Pay-Teachers.

The full set has 2 sets of 16 sheets for a total of 32 sheets of task cards.  There are a total of 120 vocabulary words presented on the cards. Set 2 is a duplicate of set 1 with the following differences. Set 1 has the answers on the right half but they are scrambled and the student will need to find the correct answers from the list. These are marked with Find the Answer.  Set 2 has the correct answers provided on the right half and is marked as  Answers

The cards are placed on the sheets so you can choose to make double backed cards.  For example card two (vocabulary meanings), folded to the back, would make a good backing for the card containing the (text).

You could also cut right half off and make a double backed card with the card containing (text) and the comprehension questions folded up to make the other side.  You could keep all of them together and fold right half back to provide word meanings and answers to the comprehension questions on the back side.

Set 1 with the mixed answers will require a student’s thought process to get an answer.  Set 2 provides answers for a flip side if you choose to make the cards part of a learning center  and self checking.  By making both sets I can differentiate the instruction for different needs and methods of instruction.

 

I am going to give you a chance to try them out with a trial deck of 10 cards. I hope this helps with your return lesson planning. Just click on the colored lettering below.

https://inspontaneousspeech.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/short-storyreviewcomprehension-II-5thppt.pdf

  

Link to TPT for full version