Concept Group 8

4 Nov

This week we used the “Skip and Pass” activity that is in the “Vocabulary” building section on this site.  This activity works best with larger groups and we only had 3 adults that could participate.  We formed 3 circles of 10 students each.  The purpose of this activity is to present the concepts of left, right, skip, every other one, and every one.  These are some of the hardest concepts for this age to understand so this activity is typically harder to do at this time of year.  It gets presented again later in the spring  and on the second presentation goes much better.  We reviewed left hand and right hand which is still very confusing.  We then did a trial of passing a ball around the circle left and right.  The students are given white or black paper shapes they place in front of them.  Students take turns tossing the  direction cube  into the center and the ball is passed following the direction on top.  The direction is something like “skip white pass right”.  The child with the ball starts passing it accordingly to those with the black paper shapes until it completes a full circle.   At this point it was heavily adult directed in getting the ball going the right direction.   The groups are generally doing  better at following directions and turn taking.

Concept Group 7

28 Oct

It’s hard to believe this was our 7th session.  We played the Memory Game or Match.  This is the childhood game where pairs of cards are mixed and placed face down.  The children take turns picking  up two cards to see if they have two cards that are the same.  It reinforces the concepts of match, same, different, and pair.  Several of the children were familiar with the game.  We also had several that weren’t.  This game tells a lot about a child’s learning strategy.  A couple of children would pick the same two cards  for each turn.  Others would take two cards at the same time not realizing they could increase their chances by picking one card up and then another card in case it wasn’t what they expected.  A couple of the kids that appeared to have difficulty remaining focused had good memories and did better than their peers.  This was a pleasant surprise.  They must be focusing more than what it appears.

Concept Group 6

24 Oct

The kindergarten math program introduced the concepts  less, least, more, and most this last week.  The classroom teacher asked if I would support that.  I was fortunate to have found another game of  “Don’t Spill the Beans” on my trip to “Goodwill” last weekend.  We had three games of “Don’t Spill the Beans” and two games of  “Kerplunk” available to us.  In both games the winner is the one with the least marbles or beans.  Instead of using the provided chambers for holding  marbles or beans I used empty paint cups.  I do this because  there aren’t enough chambers for the number of kids and in the case of “Kerplunk”,  if the marble chamber doesn’t have  to be moved there is less chance of marbles accidently coming down. 

The AM class had an extra adult helper available to us, so we divided the kids into five table groups.   The PM class did not have an extra helper, but we still divided the class into five groups.  We placed a chosen group of five students who we knew could monitor themselves with an adult standing by.  This of course stacked our other groups with students who had more difficulty monitoring themselves, but did have an adult at the table.  We  reviewed the rules of the games and stressed the concept vocabulary.

The activity went well for both classes.   Two students in my table group in the PM class had difficulty waiting for their turns and  didn’t understand they were trying to get less beans.  When I reinforced the appropriate turn taking with one student, I was told “My mom is bigger then you”.   I told him  that she probably was but he still had to take turns.  I did get a little chuckle on that one.   He was also a little disappointed when he found the student with the less beans was the winner at the end of our first round.  Sometimes experience is the best teacher.

Concept Group 5

14 Oct

This week we decided to tackle “left” and “right”.  This is a very difficult concept for 5 year olds, so we usually have several activities that go over it in the course of the year.  We start the activity by having children raise their right hand and then their left.  Funny how watching the person across the table from you just doesn’t work.   We also talk about some other cues people use like they write with their right hand and your left hand makes a natural L with your thumb and pointer finger.   As an adult you have to refrain from saying “Your right!” when they lift their left, which just adds to the confusion.

This activity uses the game of  “Blockhead”.   It’s listed on the vocabulary page as “Stacking Blocks“.  It involves spinning a spinner which tells you which hand you can pick up a block and then place on top of a growing tower of blocks in the center of the table.  If the blocks fall they are placed back into the box. 

 There is a friendly competition between table groups to see who can build the tallest tower and use all their blocks.  A couple of tables had natural born leaders who talked to their peers on the best block placements.  Other table groups were not so fortunate and had difficulty keeping their hands from the tower or taking appropriate turns.  A good introduction to team work.  In any case it was a learning experience beyond the concept words.

Concept Group 4

6 Oct

We were fortunate to have an adult volunteer in both the PM and AM classes.  This brought the table groups to 6 children with one adult.  What a difference this makes.  I would like to make a cheer and thankyou for all those parent volunteers out there. 

 The math program was reviewing shapes and catergorization this week.  My “Sequence Vocabulary” activity happens to have shapes in it, so I decided that would be a good activity.  Again I had to add 6 more sets of cards to accomodate our class size.  This was a matter of printing train and shape  pictures, pasting them on poster board, and laminating.  

In this activity the cards are drawn from a pile in the center of the table one by one.  The students have a possibility of getting a shape card or one of four cars to make a train.  It allows for the discussion of first, last, ending, middle, and  beginning of the train.  There is also a same and different decision to be made because a student doesn’t keep a card he already has.  These and the shapes go into a discard pile.  The first student to get the four train cards is declared the winner and the game can be played again.  Six students to a table made the turn taking much easier and the game appeared to go well. We went through the stack 3 times in a 20 minute period of time.  I had them each build a train sequence, review the sequence vocabulary and then rubber band each set so it would be ready for the next class.    The volunteers seemed to catch on quickly.  It’s good to have activities that don’t need much explanation.

Concept Group 3

29 Sep

Today was lesson 3 of our Kindergarten Concept Groups.  The Kindergarten teacher requested an activity that reinforced the concepts long and short since these were part of her math lesson for this week.  We did the Question Chain Activity which is posted on the vocabulary page.  It turned out to be a good choice because the counselor was taken out for an emergency and the college student had to pinch hit.   That would’ve been a big problem with some of the other activities.   Fortunately it’s an easy activity to pick up on.  I find it amazing that some of the most simple props can be quite motivating.  The kindergarten students really enjoy putting the links together and get into the competition of having the longer chain.  We also pointed out the chains that were equal or the same amount.  For the final concept they  ‘separated” them.   That is a concept that is frequently missed when we do our first BOEHM testing in the Fall.

Concept Group 2

27 Sep

I’m a little late updating the blog  this week.  The activity we did in kindergarten was not one of the activities I had posted on the vocabulary page, so it held me up.   It is posted as Cars and Maps now.   A parent kindly donated a few boxes of match box cars.  These with the ones I had were enough for 32 kids.  We divided the children up into groups of 8 with one adult.  We had a volunteer college student, the teacher, the assistant, a counselor  and I.  I unfortunately didn’t have 5 maps because I didn’t know we would have the 5th adult.   Our classes weren’t as large last year so I have materials for groups of 4. So mental note;  I should have enough for 5 groups because volunteers tend to show up unexpectedly.  The office tends to send the college students to kindergarten.  It’s a great place to start for classroom observation don’t you think?   After all, all you need to know in life you learn in kindergarten.

I find playing a board game tells me who is familiar with game etiquette and how to work the spinner.  It’s important that each child remembers what their car looks like so you may want to do some comparison of details before you start.  We of course had two cars that looked very similar.

With a board game, you can start working on turn taking and not getting upset when the turn doesn’t meet your expectation.  These are important skills in kindergarten.  People tend to forget control and handling disappointment are skills.   The spinner I use  has ” missed a turn” on it.  Some people would probably avoid having that on a spinner, but I think that adds the ability to practice another skill.  I forwarn the children what that means so they aren’t surprised when they get it.  I also have a “spin again”.  The actual winning is deemphasized.  It’s more important to complete the track.  If time allows,  I will allow each child to make it to the finish line.

This is only our 2nd full week of school for kindergarten, so I was impressed with their ability to take turns.  They were convinced to leave the cars on the board until their turn and handled the disappointment of the  missed turn.   I found everyone was not familiar with all the concepts.  We have a few english learners and a few children on IEPs so that wasn’t a surprise.  My other adults thought it was a good experience so session 2 was declared a success.

car map

Concept Groups

15 Sep

        Sometimes setting up language groups in a classroom setting  can be a bit intimidating.  Many speech therapists aren’t given funds to buy commercial programs and therefore need to develop a program on their own.  This is a rather daunting task when there are so many tasks to complete at the beginning of a school year.   I began collecting and developing activities  using materials you typically find in a school environment, games I found at thrift stores, and games I made.   I’ve posted most of  the activities  in the vocabulary section.  I thought you might enjoy hearing how they are actually carried out during the school year.

             Today we started our first session  of  “Concept Groups”.  This is only day 6 for most of our Kindergarten students.  There were 3 adults available; the counselor, speech therapist, and classroom teacher.  That made a ratio of 1 adult to 10 children.  In the future we will need to get that down to a smaller rate, but for today it worked. 

        As most of you know it’s better to start simple with new Kindergarten students.   We decided to put the emphasis on  introduction.  This was as much for the adults as it was for the kids, because we were all still learning names.  We started with a story about the first day of school and making friends.  We talked about how everyone is nervous when they don’t know people and it’s nice to know their names.  We modeled how you can ask someone their name and they can become your friend. 

             The activity was a ball circle activity that I’ve used before as an icebreaker for groups of kids.  Each adult took 10 kids to form a circle.  The adult started  it out by looking at a  child in the circle and asking “What is your name?” .  When that child responded the ball was tossed to them.  They then continued  by asking another child “What is your name?”.  When all the children have had a chance the activity was changed to calling out another child’s name and then tossing the ball to them.  This is where you find out who remembers the names.  We then rotated half the kids from each circle so that the mix would change and we would get a chance to meet everyone.

           This activity can tell you a lot about the children in the groups.  It can tell you who may have trouble following the instructions or Continue reading